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The impact of attentional set and situation awareness on dual tasking driving performance

Briggs, Gemma F.; Hole, Graham J. and Turner, Jim A.J. (2017). The impact of attentional set and situation awareness on dual tasking driving performance. Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour (Early Access).

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.trf.2017.08.007
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Abstract

The impact of attentional set and situation awareness on event detection and reaction times was investigated in 2 simulated driving experiments. Experiment 1: thirty participants viewed and reacted to thirty driving films containing unexpected items which were either driving congruent or incongruent. Group 1 completed the task without distraction; group 2 completed a concurrent conversation task. Experiment 2: thirty participants viewed and reacted to twenty driving films which contained unexpected yet driving relevant events. Half of the participants completed the task without distraction and half completed a concurrent conversation task. Measures of event detection and reaction time were recorded for both experiments. Compared to undistracted participants, dual-taskers reacted to fewer unexpected events; recorded longer reaction times; and reacted to fewer incongruent and peripheral events, suggesting an enduring attentional set for driving. Dual tasking drivers may adopt a strategy of over-reliance on schema-driven processing when attention is shared between tasks.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2017 Elsevier
ISSN: 1369-8478
Keywords: attentional set; schemas; dual tasking; cognitive workload; driving; situation awareness
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Psychology
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
Research Group: Harm and Evidence Research Collaborative (HERC)
International Centre for Comparative Criminological Research (ICCCR)
Item ID: 50934
Depositing User: Gemma Briggs
Date Deposited: 15 Sep 2017 15:26
Last Modified: 15 Sep 2018 08:52
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/50934
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