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Selecting suitable image dimensions for scanning probe microscopy

Bowen, James and Cheneler, David (2017). Selecting suitable image dimensions for scanning probe microscopy. Surfaces and Interfaces, 9 pp. 132–142.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.surfin.2017.09.003
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Abstract

The use of scanning probe microscopy to acquire topographical information from surfaces with nanoscale features is now a common occurrence in scientific and engineering research. Image sizes can be orders of magnitude greater than the height of the features being analysed, and there is often a trade-off between image quality and acquisition time. This work investigates a commonly encountered problem in nanometrology - how to choose a scan size which is representative of the entire sample. The topographies of a variety of samples are investigated, including metals, polymers, and thin films.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2017 Elsevier
ISSN: 2468-0230
Project Funding Details:
Funded Project NameProject IDFunding Body
Not SetNot SetEuropean Regional Development Fund (ERDF)
Keywords: Atomic force microscopy; roughness; scanning probe microscopy; surface; topography
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Engineering and Innovation
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Research Group: Smart Materials
Item ID: 50919
Depositing User: James Bowen
Date Deposited: 13 Sep 2017 15:13
Last Modified: 20 Oct 2018 08:44
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/50919
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