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Drug-Paired Contextual Stimuli Increase Dendritic Spine Dynamics in Select Nucleus Accumbens Neurons

Singer, Bryan F.; Bubula, Nancy; Li, Dongdong; Przybycien-Szymanska, Magdalena M.; Bindokas, Vytautas P. and Vezina, Paul (2016). Drug-Paired Contextual Stimuli Increase Dendritic Spine Dynamics in Select Nucleus Accumbens Neurons. Neuropsychopharmacology, 41(8) pp. 2178–2187.

DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1038/npp.2016.39
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Abstract

Repeated exposure to amphetamine leads to both associative conditioning and nonassociative sensitization. Here we assessed the contribution of neuronal ensembles in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) to these behaviors. Animals exposed to amphetamine IP or in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) showed a sensitized locomotor response when challenged with amphetamine weeks later. Both exposure routes also increased ΔFosB levels in the NAcc. Further characterization of these ΔFosB+ neurons, however, revealed that amphetamine had no effect on dendritic spine density or size, indicating that these neurons do not undergo changes in dendritic spine morphology that accompany the expression of nonassociative sensitization. Additional experiments determined how neurons in the NAcc contribute to the expression of associative conditioning. A discrimination learning procedure was used to expose rats to IP or VTA amphetamine either Paired or Unpaired with an open field. As expected, compared with Controls, Paired rats administered IP amphetamine subsequently showed a conditioned locomotor response when challenged with saline in the open field, an effect accompanied by an increase in c-Fos+ neurons in the medial NAcc. Further characterization of these c-Fos+ cells revealed that Paired rats showed an increase in the density of dendritic spines and the frequency of medium-sized spines in the NAcc. In contrast, Paired rats previously exposed to VTA amphetamine showed neither conditioned locomotion nor conditioned c-Fos+ expression. Together, these results suggest a role for c-Fos+ neurons in the medial NAcc and rapid changes in the morphology of their dendritic spines in the expression of conditioning evoked by amphetamine-paired contextual stimuli.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2016 American College of Neuropsychopharmacology
ISSN: 0893-133X
Project Funding Details:
Funded Project NameProject IDFunding Body
Not SetT32 DA07255US National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Not SetF31 DA030021-01A1US National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Not SetNot SetChicago Biomedical Consortium with support from The Searle Funds at The Chicago Community Trust.
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Life, Health and Chemical Sciences
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Item ID: 50827
Depositing User: Bryan Singer
Date Deposited: 06 Sep 2017 14:03
Last Modified: 01 May 2019 19:06
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/50827
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