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Plurality in the Capital: The Christian Responses to London Religious Minorities since 1800

Wolffe, John (2015). Plurality in the Capital: The Christian Responses to London Religious Minorities since 1800. Studies in Church History, 51 pp. 232–258.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1017/S042420840005021X
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Abstract

On a late spring day in 1856 Prince Albert carried out one of the less routine royal engagements of the Victorian era, by laying the foundation stone of what was to become ‘The Strangers’ Home for Asiatics, Africans and South Sea Islanders’, located at Limehouse in the London docklands. The deputation receiving the prince was headed by the earl of Chichester, who was the First Church Estates Commissioner and president of the Church Missionary Society, and included Thomas Carr, formerly bishop of Bombay, Maharajah Duleep Singh, a Sikh convert to Christianity and a favourite of Queen Victoria, and William Henry Sykes, MP and chairman of the East India Company.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2015 Ecclesiastical History Society
ISSN: 0424-2084
Project Funding Details:
Funded Project NameProject IDFunding Body
Building on History: Religion in London. (A-11-025-JW)AH/J004480/1AHRC (Arts & Humanities Research Council)
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Social Sciences and Global Studies > Religious Studies
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Social Sciences and Global Studies
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
Item ID: 50687
Depositing User: John Wolffe
Date Deposited: 25 Aug 2017 15:40
Last Modified: 06 Aug 2019 18:16
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/50687
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