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The Multiple Forms of Violence in the Asylum System

Canning, Victoria (2017). The Multiple Forms of Violence in the Asylum System. In: Cooper, Vickie and Whyte, David eds. The Violence of Austerity. London: Pluto Press, pp. 67–74.

URL: http://www.plutobooks.com/display.asp?K=9780745399...
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Abstract

People seeking asylum under international refugee laws have often experienced disproportionately violent histories. The nature of asylum places abuses such as torture, sexual violence, and familial death or killing central to claims for refugee status and, as such, signatories to the Refugee Convention are obligated to provide safety. Rather than consistently providing safety and security for those who might require it most, however, British governments have worked to deter people from seeking asylum and deflect from these international obligations. Moreover, as this chapter will argue, measures implemented since the onslaught of so-called austerity measures have both facilitated and inflicted violence, structurally and directly.

Item Type: Book Section
Copyright Holders: 2017 The Editors
ISBN: 0-7453-9948-7, 978-0-7453-9948-5
Project Funding Details:
Funded Project NameProject IDFunding Body
Gendered Experiences of Social Harm in Asylum: Exploring State Responses to Persecuted Women in Britain, Denmark and SwedenES/N016718/1ESRC Economic and Social Research Council
Keywords: Inequality; Destitution; Violence; Feminism; Harm; Zemiology; Austerity; Immigration; Refugees; Asylum; Sociology; Poverty
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > History, Religious Studies, Sociology, Social Policy and Criminology
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Harm and Evidence Research Collaborative (HERC)
Item ID: 50655
Depositing User: Victoria Canning
Date Deposited: 25 Aug 2017 13:50
Last Modified: 25 Aug 2017 13:50
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/50655
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