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Markets and the Arts of Attachment

Cochoy, Franck; Deville, Joe and McFall, Liz eds. (2017). Markets and the Arts of Attachment. CRESC: Culture, Economy and the Social. Abingdon: Routledge.

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Abstract

The collection explores how sentiment and relation are organised internally in consumer markets. While tackling market action sociologically simply by adding a ‘little more soul’ to economic agents has been widely critiqued for neglecting the ways economic practices necessarily contain sentimental and social elements, questions remain about the way these elements are organised to create market attachment. The contributors explore the tools and techniques used to work with sentiment, aesthetics and relationships in strategies of, for example, website optimization, digital algorithms, personal selling, industrial design, neuromarketing, Customer Relationship Management (CRM), and so on. The results range from enduring, stable ties to fragile, partial and broken links that cross time and space in both regular and unpredictable patterns. These arts play a crucial and largely unremarked role in the technical, organizational and material processes of forging and maintaining the channels necessary to attach people to markets.

Item Type: Edited Book
Copyright Holders: 2017 The Authors
ISBN: 1-138-90429-5, 978-1-138-90429-3
Keywords: Apple Watch; devices; consumer; big data; digital
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > History, Religious Studies, Sociology, Social Policy and Criminology
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Citizenship, Identities and Governance (CCIG)
Related URLs:
Item ID: 50461
Depositing User: Liz McFall
Date Deposited: 21 Aug 2017 15:32
Last Modified: 21 Aug 2017 15:53
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/50461
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