The Open UniversitySkip to content
 

The constituent structure of autobiographical memory: Autobiographical fluency in people with chronic epilepsy

Barnett, Matthew P.; Newman, Howard W.; Richardson, John T. E.; Thompson, Pamela and Upton, Dominic (2000). The constituent structure of autobiographical memory: Autobiographical fluency in people with chronic epilepsy. Memory, 8(6) pp. 413–424.

DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1080/09658210050156868
Google Scholar: Look up in Google Scholar

Abstract

A total of 59 people with chronic epilepsy recalled autobiographical episodes and personal facts (such as the names of friends or teachers) from various lifetime periods. Also tested was their verbal fluency and their fluency in generating items from semantic categories (animals, vegetables, US presidents, and British prime ministers). Results of a cluster analysis and a common factor analysis confirmed a dissociation between the retrieval of autobiographical information and that of nonpersonal semantic information. There was a similar dissociation between the recall of personal episodes and the recall of the personal information, but the corresponding factors were highly correlated with one another. Finally, verbal fluency performance was significantly correlated with the retrieval of personal information, personal episodes, and common objects, but not with that of public figures. The constituent structure of autobiographical fluency is extremely robust across different populations.

Item Type: Journal Item
ISSN: 0965-8211
Academic Unit/School: Learning and Teaching Innovation (LTI) > Institute of Educational Technology (IET)
Learning and Teaching Innovation (LTI)
Research Group: Centre for Research in Education and Educational Technology (CREET)
Item ID: 49885
Depositing User: John T. E. Richardson
Date Deposited: 06 Jul 2017 12:48
Last Modified: 07 Dec 2018 10:53
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/49885
Share this page:

Metrics

Altmetrics from Altmetric

Citations from Dimensions

Actions (login may be required)

Policies | Disclaimer

© The Open University   contact the OU