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Assessing the Accuracy of an Algorithm for the Estimation of Spatial Gait Parameters Using Inertial Measurement Units: Application to Healthy Subject and Hemiparetic Stroke Survivor

Visi, Federico; Georgiou, Theodoros; Holland, Simon; Pinzone, Ornella; Donaldson, Glenis and Tetley, Josie (2017). Assessing the Accuracy of an Algorithm for the Estimation of Spatial Gait Parameters Using Inertial Measurement Units: Application to Healthy Subject and Hemiparetic Stroke Survivor. In: 4th International Conference on Movement Computing (MOCO '17), June 28-30, 2017, London, UK, ACM.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1145/3077981.3078034
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Abstract

We have reviewed and assessed the reliability of a dead reckon- ing and drift correction algorithm for the estimation of spatial gait parameters using Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs). In particular, we are interested in obtaining accurate stride lengths measurements in order to assess the effects of a wearable haptic cueing device designed to assist people with neurological health conditions during gait rehabilitation. To assess the accuracy of the stride lengths estimates, we compared the output of the algorithm with measurements obtained using a high-end marker-based motion capture system, here adopted as a gold standard. In addition, we introduce an alternative method for detecting initial impact events (i.e. the instants at which one foot contacts the ground, here used for de- limiting strides) using accelerometer data. Our method, based on a kinematic feature we named ‘jerkage’, has proved more robust than detecting peaks on raw accelerometer data. We argue that the resulting measurements of stride lengths are accurate enough to provide trend data needed to support worthwhile gait rehabilitation applications. This approach has potential to assist physiotherapists and patients without access to fully-equipped movement labs. More specifically, it has applications for collecting data to guide and assess gait rehabilitation both outdoors and at home.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item
Copyright Holders: 2017 The Authors
ISBN: 1-4503-5209-X, 978-1-4503-5209-3
Keywords: Gait Analysis; Haptic Bracelets; Inertial Measurement Unit; IMU; Motion Capture; Dead Reckoning; Stroke; Hemiparetic Gait; Gait Rehabilitation
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Computing and Communications
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Health and Wellbeing PRA (Priority Research Area)
Centre for Research in Computing (CRC)
Item ID: 49866
Depositing User: Theodoros Georgiou
Date Deposited: 14 Jul 2017 13:54
Last Modified: 06 Nov 2017 10:45
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/49866
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