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Shock-Induced Texture in Lunar Mg-Suite Apatite and its Effect on Volatile Distribution

Cernok, A.; Darling, J.; White, L.; Dunlop, J. and Anand, M. (2017). Shock-Induced Texture in Lunar Mg-Suite Apatite and its Effect on Volatile Distribution. In: 5th European Lunar Symposium, 02 - 03 May 2017, Münster, Germany.

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Abstract

The lunar Mg-suite are plutonic rocks which represent an episode of crustal building following primordial differentiation of the Moon. They range in crystallization ages from 4.43-4.1 Ga. This suite of rocks includes dunites, troctolites, and norites and comprises 20-30% of the lunar crust up to a depth of ~ 50-60 km. Apatite is the most common volatile-bearing mineral in lunar rocks, which made them an ideal target for in-situ studies of volatiles. This study focusses on pristine highland samples that have experienced different levels of shock metamorphism. Therefore, they are valuable samples for understanding how the content of water and other volatiles, as well as their isotopic signature respond to shock.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item
Project Funding Details:
Funded Project NameProject IDFunding Body
Marie S. Curie FellowhsipNot SetEuropean Commission
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Physical Sciences
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Earth, Planetary, Space and Astronomical Research (CEPSAR)
Related URLs:
Item ID: 49651
Depositing User: Ana Cernok
Date Deposited: 19 Jun 2017 15:05
Last Modified: 19 Jun 2017 15:05
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/49651
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