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Diagenetic silica enrichment and late-stage groundwater activity in Gale crater, Mars

Frydenvang, J.; Gasada, P. J.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Grotzinger, J. P-; Wiens, R. C.; Newsom, H. E.; Edgett, K. S.; Watkins, J.; Bridges, J. C.; Maurice, S; Fisk, M. R.; Johnson, J. R.; Rapin, W.; Stein, N. T.; Clegg, S. M.; Schwenzer, Susanne; Bedford, Candice; Edwards, P.; Mangold, N.; Cousin, A.; Anderson, R. B.; Payre, V.; Vaniman, D.; Blake, D. F.; Lanza, N. L.; Gupta, S.; Van Beek, J.; Sautter, V; Meslin, P.-Y.; Rice, M.; Milliken, R.; Gellert, R.; Thompson, L.; Clark, B. C.; Sumner, D. Y.; Fraeman, A. A.; Kinch, K. M.; Madsen, M. B.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Jun, I.; Calef, F. and Vasavada, A. R. (2017). Diagenetic silica enrichment and late-stage groundwater activity in Gale crater, Mars. Geophysical Research Letters (Early Access).

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1002/2017GL073323
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Abstract

Diagenetic silica enrichment in fracture-associated halos that crosscut lacustrine and unconformably overlying aeolian sedimentary bedrock is observed on the lower north slope of Aeolis Mons in Gale crater, Mars. The diagenetic silica enrichment is colocated with detrital silica enrichment observed in the lacustrine bedrock yet extends into a considerably younger, unconformably draping aeolian sandstone, implying that diagenetic silica enrichment postdates the detrital silica enrichment. A causal connection between the detrital and diagenetic silica enrichment implies that water was present in the subsurface of Gale crater long after deposition of the lacustrine sediments and that it mobilized detrital amorphous silica and precipitated it along fractures in the overlying bedrock. Although absolute timing is uncertain, the observed diagenesis likely represents some of the most recent groundwater activity in Gale crater and suggests that the timescale of potential habitability extended considerably beyond the time that the lacustrine sediments of Aeolis Mons were deposited.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2017 American Geophysical Union
ISSN: 0094-8276
Project Funding Details:
Funded Project NameProject IDFunding Body
Support for Mars Science Laboratory OperationsST/P002110/1UKSA UK Space Agency
Keywords: Mars Science Laboratory; Mars silica; habitability; veins; halos
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Environment, Earth and Ecosystem Sciences
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Physical Sciences
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Earth, Planetary, Space and Astronomical Research (CEPSAR)
Item ID: 49526
Depositing User: Susanne Schwenzer
Date Deposited: 02 Jun 2017 09:47
Last Modified: 02 Oct 2017 12:44
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/49526
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