Language and libertarianism: the politics of cyberculture and the culture of cyberpolitics

Jordan, Tim (2001). Language and libertarianism: the politics of cyberculture and the culture of cyberpolitics. Sociological Review, 49(1) pp. 1–17.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-954X.00241

Abstract

A significant number of theories concerning the nature of cyberspace or virtuality are being constructed with little regard for the empirical realities of online life. This article sets out certain simple empirical factors related to the nature first of politics in cyberspace and second culture in cyberspace. These questions are posed as 'what is the politics of cyberculture?' and 'what is the culture of cyberpolitics?'. The politics of cyberculture revolves around issues of grossly uneven regional distribution of the Internet and a bias toward anglo-american language and culture that is based on the competitive individual. The culture of cyberpolitics revolves around informational forms of libertarian and anarchist ideologies that posit cyberspace as the realm of individual freedom. These cultures and politics can be related to each other as the structure and action of cyberspace. The assumption that cyberspace is constituted by individuals is revealed as an assumption of both, and connection between, cyberpolitics and cybercultures.

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