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Examining the designs of computer-based assessment and its impact on student engagement, satisfaction, and pass rates

Nguyen, Quan; Rienties, Bart; Toetenel, Lisette; Ferguson, Rebecca and Whitelock, Denise (2017). Examining the designs of computer-based assessment and its impact on student engagement, satisfaction, and pass rates. Computers in Human Behavior (Early Access).

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2017.03.028
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Abstract

Many researchers who study the impact of computer-based assessment (CBA) focus on the affordances or complexities of CBA approaches in comparison to traditional assessment methods. This study examines how CBA approaches were configured within and between modules, and the impact of assessment design on students’ engagement, satisfaction, and pass rates. The analysis was conducted using a combination of longitudinal visualisations, correlational analysis, and fixed-effect models on 74 undergraduate modules and their 72,377 students. Our findings indicate that educators designed very different assessment strategies, which significantly influenced student engagement as measured by time spent in the virtual learning environment (VLE). Weekly analyses indicated that assessment activities were balanced with other learning activities, which suggests that educators tended to aim for a consistent workload when designing assessment strategies. Since most of the assessments were computer-based, students spent more time on the VLE during assessment weeks. By controlling for heterogeneity within and between modules, learning design could explain up to 69% of the variability in students’ time spent on the VLE. Furthermore, assessment activities were significantly related to pass rates, but no clear relation with satisfaction was found. Our findings highlight the importance of CBA and learning design to how students learn online.

Item Type: Article
Copyright Holders: 2017 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN: 0747-5632
Project Funding Details:
Funded Project NameProject IDFunding Body
Open World LearningNot SetLeverhulme Trust
Keywords: computer-based assessment; learning design; learning analytics; academic retention; learner satisfaction; virtual learning environment
Academic Unit/School: Learning Teaching and Innovation (LTI) > Institute of Educational Technology (IET)
Learning Teaching and Innovation (LTI)
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Research in Education and Educational Technology (CREET)
Item ID: 48988
Depositing User: Bart Rienties
Date Deposited: 21 Mar 2017 11:31
Last Modified: 19 Jun 2017 09:43
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/48988
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