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The TAPS Project. 6: New Long-Stay Psychiatric Patients and Social Deprivation

Thornicroft, Graham; Margolius, Olga and Jones, David (1992). The TAPS Project. 6: New Long-Stay Psychiatric Patients and Social Deprivation. British Journal of Psychiatry, 161(5) pp. 621–624.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1192/bjp.161.5.621
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Abstract

The clinical and social characteristics of new long-stay (NLS) patients at Friern and Claybury Hospitals are described, together with their accumulation rates within health districts in north-east London, and the associations between accumulation rates and social deprivation. There is a fourfold variation between local districts in annual accumulation rates of NLS patients (between 2.5 and 11 per 100 000 population); 0.55 of this variation is accounted for by the Jarman scores of social deprivation, and 0.81 by local rates of unemployment. Other recent British studies support this finding that measures of social deprivation can statistically explain a large proportion of the variation in treated rates of psychiatric morbidity, and may be useful in predicting needs for psychiatric services.

Item Type: Journal Item
ISSN: 1472-1465
Keywords: new long-stay (NLS) patients; north East London; NHS; psychiatric services
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Psychology and Counselling > Psychology
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Psychology and Counselling
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
Item ID: 48955
Depositing User: David W. Jones
Date Deposited: 19 May 2011 13:47
Last Modified: 13 Sep 2019 04:26
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/48955
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