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Managing legacy system costs: A case study of a meta-assessment model to identify solutions in a large financial services company

Crotty, James and Horrocks, Ivan (2017). Managing legacy system costs: A case study of a meta-assessment model to identify solutions in a large financial services company. Applied Computing and Informatics (Early Access).

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aci.2016.12.001
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Abstract

Financial services organisations spend a significant amount of their IT budgets maintaining legacy systems. This paper identifies the characteristics of legacy systems and explores why such systems are so costly to maintain and support. Three models for the assessment and management of legacy system costs are examined and a new meta-model that addresses differences between the existing models is proposed. The meta-model is then applied to a large UK financial services company - FinCo. The results are then compared with the firm's actual legacy system management plans. The paper concludes by identifying improvements the company should make to these plans and its longer-term strategy for managing legacy systems.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2016 The Authors
ISSN: 2210-8327
Keywords: Legacy system costs; IT valuation; assessment models; solutions; case studies
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Engineering and Innovation
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Item ID: 48393
Depositing User: Ivan Horrocks
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2017 13:45
Last Modified: 01 Nov 2017 15:49
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/48393
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