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Stuart Hall and the theory and practice of articulation

Clarke, John (2015). Stuart Hall and the theory and practice of articulation. Discourse: Studies in the cultural politics of education, 36(2) pp. 275–286.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1080/01596306.2015.1013247
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Abstract

In this article, I argue that the idea of articulation links three different dimensions of Stuart Hall’s work: it is central to the work of cultural politics, to the work of hegemony, and to his practice of embodied pedagogy. I claim that his approach to pedagogy entails the art of listening combined with the practice of theorising in the service of expanding who belongs to the public. This involves the work of translation, finding ways of addressing different audiences. I treat each of these aspects in turn, drawing out the salience of articulation for each and suggest that these three dimensions are themselves articulated by Hall’s commitment to the theory and practice of articulation.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2015 Taylor & Francis
ISSN: 1469-3739
Keywords: articulation; cultural politics; hegemony; common sense; pedagogy
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Social Sciences and Global Studies > Social Policy and Criminology
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Social Sciences and Global Studies
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
Item ID: 48078
Depositing User: John Clarke
Date Deposited: 03 Jan 2017 15:39
Last Modified: 23 Mar 2020 20:48
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/48078
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