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In situ measurement of atmospheric krypton and xenon on Mars with Mars Science Laboratory

Conrad, P. G.; Malespin, C. A.; Franz, H. B.; Pepin, R. O.; Trainer, M. G.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Atraya, S. K.; Freissinet, C.; Jones, J. H.; Manning, H.; Owen, T.; Pavlov, A. A.; Wiens, R. C.; Wong, M. H. and Mahaffy, P. R. (2016). In situ measurement of atmospheric krypton and xenon on Mars with Mars Science Laboratory. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 454 pp. 1–9.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2016.08.028
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Abstract

Mars Science Laboratory's Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation has measured all of the stable isotopes of the heavy noble gases krypton and xenon in the martian atmosphere, in situ, from the Curiosity Rover at Gale Crater, Mars. Previous knowledge of martian atmospheric krypton and xenon isotope ratios has been based upon a combination of the Viking mission's krypton and xenon detections and measurements of noble gas isotope ratios in martian meteorites. However, the meteorite measurements reveal an impure mixture of atmospheric, mantle, and spallation contributions. The xenon and krypton isotopic measurements reported here include the complete set of stable isotopes, unmeasured by Viking. The new results generally agree with Mars meteorite measurements but also provide a unique opportunity to identify various non-atmospheric heavy noble gas components in the meteorites. Kr isotopic measurements define a solar-like atmospheric composition, but deviating from the solar wind pattern at 80Kr and 82Kr in a manner consistent with contributions originating from neutron capture in Br. The Xe measurements suggest an intriguing possibility that isotopes lighter than 132Xe have been enriched to varying degrees by spallation and neutron capture products degassed to the atmosphere from the regolith, and a model is constructed to explore this possibility. Such a spallation component, however, is not apparent in atmospheric Xe trapped in the glassy phases of martian meteorites.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2016 Elsevier
ISSN: 0012-821X
Project Funding Details:
Funded Project NameProject IDFunding Body
Support for Mars Science Laboratory OperationsST/P002110/1UKSA UK Space Agency
Keywords: Mars Science Laboratory; noble gases; xenon; Mars atmosphere; krypton
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Environment, Earth and Ecosystem Sciences
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Research Group: Space
Related URLs:
Item ID: 47798
Depositing User: Susanne Schwenzer
Date Deposited: 11 Nov 2016 15:27
Last Modified: 04 May 2019 00:51
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/47798
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