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Selfish learning: The impact of self-referential encoding on children's literacy attainment

Turk, David J.; Gillespie-Smith, Karri; Krigolson, Olave E.; Havard, Catriona; Conway, Martin A. and Cunningham, Sheila J. (2015). Selfish learning: The impact of self-referential encoding on children's literacy attainment. Learning and instruction, 40 pp. 54–60.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.learninstruc.2015.08.001
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Abstract

Self-referencing (i.e., thinking about oneself during encoding) can increase attention toward to-be-encoded material, and support memory for information in adults and children. The current inquiry tested an educational application of this ‘self reference effect’ (SRE) on memory. A self-referential modification of literacy tasks (vocabulary spelling) was tested in two experiments. In Experiment 1, seven-to nine-year-old children (N = 47) were asked to learn the spelling of four nonsense words by copying the vocabulary and generating sentences. Half of the children were asked to include themselves as a subject in each sentence. Results showed that children in this self-referent condition produced longer sentences and increased spelling accuracy by more than 20%, relative to those in an other-referent condition. Experiment 2 (N = 32) replicated this pattern in real-word learning. These findings demonstrate the significant potential advantages of utilizing self-referential encoding in the classroom.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2015 Elsevier
ISSN: 0959-4752
Keywords: Self; Memory; Literacy; Engagement; Attention
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Psychology
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Policing Research and Learning (CPRL)
Harm and Evidence Research Collaborative (HERC)
Item ID: 47795
Depositing User: Catriona Havard
Date Deposited: 09 Nov 2016 15:22
Last Modified: 17 May 2017 04:44
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/47795
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