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Researching the cognitive validity of GEPT High-Intermediate and Advanced Reading: an eye tracking and stimulated recall study

Bax, Stephen and Chan, Sathena (2016). Researching the cognitive validity of GEPT High-Intermediate and Advanced Reading: an eye tracking and stimulated recall study. The Language Training and Testing Center (LTTC) Taipei, Taiwan (R.O.C).

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Abstract

It is important for any language test to establish its cognitive validity in order to ensure that the test elicits from test takers those cognitive processes which correspond to the processes which they would normally employ in the target real-life context (Weir 2005). This study investigates the cognitive validity of the GEPT Reading Test at two levels. High-intermediate (CEFR B2) and Advanced (CEFR C1), using innovative eye-tracking technology and detailed stimulated recall interviews and surveys.

Representative reading items were carefully selected from across all parts of the GEPT High- Intermediate Level Reading Test and the GEPT Advanced Level Reading Test. Taiwanese students (n=24) studying Masters level programmes at British universities were asked to complete the test items on a computer, while the Tobii X2 Eye Tracker was used to track their gaze behaviour during completion of the test items. Immediately after they had completed each individual part, they were asked to report the cognitive process they employed by using a Reading Process Checklist, and a further (n=8) then participated in a detailed stimulated recall interview while viewing video footage of their gaze patterns.

Taking into account all these sources of data, it was found that the High-Intermediate section of the GEPT test successfully elicited and tested an appropriate range of lower and higher cognitive processes, as defined in Khalifa and Weir (2009). It was also concluded that the Advanced sections of the test elicited the same set of cognitive processes as the High- Intermediate test, with the addition in the final section of the most difficult of all in Khalifa and Weir's scheme.

In summary, it is apparent that the two elements of the GEPT test which were researched in this project were successful in requiring of candidates the range of cognitive processing activity commensurate with High-Intermediate and Advanced reading levels respectively, which is an important element in establishing the cognitive validity of the GEPT test.

Item Type: Other
Copyright Holders: 2016 The Language Training and Testing Center (LTTC) Taipei, Taiwan (R.O.C)
Keywords: reading; eye tracking; language testing; assessment; cognitive validity
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS) > Languages and Applied Linguistics
Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS)
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Language & Literacies
Health and Wellbeing PRA (Priority Research Area)
Related URLs:
Item ID: 47502
Depositing User: Stephen Bax
Date Deposited: 02 Nov 2016 10:18
Last Modified: 16 Aug 2017 13:21
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/47502
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