The Open UniversitySkip to content
 

Vibrational lifetimes and friction in adsorbate motion determined from quasi-elastic scattering

Lechner, Barbara A. J.; Hedgeland, Holly; Jardine, Andrew P.; Allison, William; Hinch, B. J. and Ellis, John (2015). Vibrational lifetimes and friction in adsorbate motion determined from quasi-elastic scattering. Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 17 pp. 21819–21823.

Full text available as:
[img] PDF (Version of Record) - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (1MB)
DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1039/C5CP03123K
Google Scholar: Look up in Google Scholar

Abstract

The vibrational excitation of molecules adsorbed on a surface is typically probed by spectroscopic techniques such as infrared or Raman spectroscopy. In the present article we demonstrate an alternative method to determine vibrational lifetimes of adsorbate molecules using quasi-elastic helium atom scattering (QHAS). As a probe of diffusive motion of molecules on surfaces QHAS is well established. Here, we demonstrate that QHAS can also be used to probe the vibrational lifetime of a molecule in its adsorption well. Measurements of cyclopentadienyl, C5H5, on Cu(111) allow us to distinguish two substrate phonon modes as well as two molecular vibrational modes, perpendicular and parallel to the surface. We further find that the dephasing of the vibrational motion corresponds to the friction determined in previous diffusion measurements.

Item Type: Journal Item
ISSN: 1463-9076
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Physical Sciences
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Research Group: Physics
Item ID: 47349
Depositing User: Holly Hedgeland
Date Deposited: 27 Sep 2016 13:19
Last Modified: 09 Dec 2018 01:27
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/47349
Share this page:

Metrics

Altmetrics from Altmetric

Citations from Dimensions

Download history for this item

These details should be considered as only a guide to the number of downloads performed manually. Algorithmic methods have been applied in an attempt to remove automated downloads from the displayed statistics but no guarantee can be made as to the accuracy of the figures.

Actions (login may be required)

Policies | Disclaimer

© The Open University   contact the OU