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It’s the state, stupid: 21st gentrification and state-led evictions

Paton, Kirsteen and Cooper, Vickie (2016). It’s the state, stupid: 21st gentrification and state-led evictions. Sociological Review (In Press).

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Abstract

A recent article critiquing the hipster-hating gentrification protests, titled, ‘It’s Capitalism, Stupid’ (Dawson 2015) warns that such a focus obscures the structural processes at play. We extend this critique by suggesting that it's the state too, and this is an advancement of Smith’s (1996) theorization. While state-led gentrification was delivered via governmental policies through regeneration, the state also, for the most part, simultaneously protected people from eviction and displacement through welfare provisions and regulation - which secured tenancies through much of the 20th century. But this has fundamentally changed over time, galvanising in this post-crash, global recessionary period as government policies accelerate gentrification, like never before. We use the term ‘accumulation by repossession’ to capture the growing profitability of displacement processes and evictions occurring in key urban areas. By refocusing attention on the drivers of gentrification and evictions today in this article, we plot the advance of the urban frontier.

Item Type: Journal Item
ISSN: 1467-954X
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > History, Religious Studies, Sociology, Social Policy and Criminology
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Harm and Evidence Research Collaborative (HERC)
Item ID: 47082
Depositing User: Victoria Cooper
Date Deposited: 24 Aug 2016 08:58
Last Modified: 04 Aug 2017 09:58
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/47082
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