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Social death in end-of-life care policy

Borgstrom, Erica (2015). Social death in end-of-life care policy. Contemporary Social Science: Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences, 10(3) pp. 272–283.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2015.1109799
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Abstract

Social death denotes a loss of personhood. The concept of social death is engaged with in English end-of-life care policy that sees social death before physical death as a problem. Policy-makers posit that dying persons are likely to be subject to a social death prior to their physical death unless they play an active and aware role in planning their death, facilitated through communication and access to services. Such a view foregrounds a vision of agency and does not address Sudnow's critique of how care of the dying focuses on the body.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2015 Academy of Social Sciences
ISSN: 2158-205X
Project Funding Details:
Funded Project NameProject IDFunding Body
Not SetNot SetNIHR (National Institute of Health Research)
Keywords: social death; dying; end-of-life care; policy; England
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS) > Health, Wellbeing and Social Care > Health and Social Care
Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS) > Health, Wellbeing and Social Care
Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS)
Item ID: 46826
Depositing User: Erica Borgstrom
Date Deposited: 18 Aug 2016 08:33
Last Modified: 08 Dec 2018 00:26
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/46826
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