The Open UniversitySkip to content
 

Exploring the user – IT professional relationship

Hinton, Matthew (2016). Exploring the user – IT professional relationship. In: Proceedings of IADIS International Conference ICT, Society and Human Beings 2016 (part of MCCSIS 2016) (Kommers, Piet; Abraham, Ajith P. and Roth, Jörg eds.), Madeira, Portugal, pp. 280–282.

Full text available as:
[img]
Preview
PDF (Version of Record) - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (797kB) | Preview
URL: http://www.iadisportal.org/digital-library/explori...
Google Scholar: Look up in Google Scholar

Abstract

Drawing on theoretical developments within the innovation literature, a conceptual model has been developed that draws a distinction between the adoption and assimilation of information technology (IT). The substantive conclusions are that a number of incongruences exist between IT professionals and end-users. These cover 1) the mismatch between business needs and the technology solution 2) inability of adoption processes to address issues of a social, organizational, or user nature 3) failure to recognize the importance of the process of interaction between various parties to technology assimilation. By addressing the assimilation process, the conceptual model offers a way to reframe our understanding from a user perspective.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item
Copyright Holders: 2016 IADIS Press
ISBN: 989-8533-54-4, 978-989-8533-54-8
Extra Information: Presented at the Multi Conference on Computer Science and Information Systems (MCCSIS 2016), Madeira, Portugal, 1-4 Jul 2016.
Keywords: user satisfaction; technology assimilation; service delivery
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Business and Law (FBL) > Business > Department for Public Leadership and Social Enterprise
Faculty of Business and Law (FBL) > Business
Faculty of Business and Law (FBL)
Item ID: 46767
Depositing User: Matthew Hinton
Date Deposited: 14 Jul 2016 09:24
Last Modified: 27 Sep 2019 16:27
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/46767
Share this page:

Download history for this item

These details should be considered as only a guide to the number of downloads performed manually. Algorithmic methods have been applied in an attempt to remove automated downloads from the displayed statistics but no guarantee can be made as to the accuracy of the figures.

Actions (login may be required)

Policies | Disclaimer

© The Open University   contact the OU