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Rough sleepers in policy and practice: chaotic and off course, or misunderstood?

McCulloch, Daniel (2015). Rough sleepers in policy and practice: chaotic and off course, or misunderstood? Harm and Evidence Research Collaborative, Milton Keynes.

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Abstract

Since 2010 the number of people sleeping rough has increased year-on-year, according to official estimates. Historically, rough sleepers have been the subject of national government policies, which have made distinctions between ‘deserving’ and ‘undeserving’ individuals. However, more recently, government policies have also employed other terms to describe rough sleepers’ lives. Terms such as ‘chaotic’, ‘off track’, and ‘off course’ have been mobilised in policy framings of rough sleepers’ lives. These policy terms suggest a particular way of understanding the lives of rough sleepers – as disorganised, abnormal and headed in the wrong direction.

But, to what extent to these reflect the experiences and understandings of rough sleepers themselves? One way to consider this question is to explore rough sleepers’ accounts of their own lives, an approach I take here, drawing upon work undertaken for my PhD.

In that research, I spent nine months in homelessness services, talking to people who had slept rough. I also interviewed 17 people who identified as having slept rough or having had no accommodation over a period of nine months.

Item Type: Other
Copyright Holders: 2015 The Author
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > History, Religious Studies, Sociology, Social Policy and Criminology
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Harm and Evidence Research Collaborative (HERC)
Item ID: 46714
Depositing User: Daniel McCulloch
Date Deposited: 24 Jun 2016 09:12
Last Modified: 29 Nov 2016 15:56
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/46714
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