The Open UniversitySkip to content
 

Diet patterns are associated with demographic factors and nutritional status in south Indian children

Kehoe, Sarah H.; Krishnaveni, Ghattu V.; Veena, Sargoor R.; Guntupalli, Aravinda M.; Margetts, Barrie M.; Fall, Caroline H. D. and Robinson, Sian M. (2014). Diet patterns are associated with demographic factors and nutritional status in south Indian children. Maternal and Child Nutrition, 10(1) pp. 145–158.

Full text available as:
[img]
Preview
PDF (Version of Record) - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (150kB) | Preview
URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC392063...
DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1111/mcn.12046
Google Scholar: Look up in Google Scholar

Abstract

The burden of non-communicable chronic disease (NCD) in India is increasing. Diet and body composition 'track' from childhood into adult life and contribute to the development of risk factors for NCD. Little is known about the diet patterns of Indian children. We aimed to identify diet patterns and study associations with body composition and socio-demographic factors in the Mysore Parthenon Study cohort. We collected anthropometric and demographic data from children aged 9.5 years (n = 538). We also administered a food frequency questionnaire and measured fasting blood concentrations of folate and vitamin B12. Using principal component analysis, we identified two diet patterns. The 'snack and fruit' pattern was characterised by frequent intakes of snacks, fruit, sweetened drinks, rice and meat dishes and leavened breads. The 'lacto-vegetarian' pattern was characterised by frequent intakes of finger millet, vegetarian rice dishes, yoghurt, vegetable dishes and infrequent meat consumption. Adherence to the 'snack and fruit' pattern was associated with season, being Muslim and urban dwelling. Adherence to the lacto-vegetarian pattern was associated with being Hindu, rural dwelling and a lower maternal body mass index. The 'snack and fruit' pattern was negatively associated with the child's adiposity. The lacto-vegetarian pattern was positively associated with blood folate concentration and negatively with vitamin B12 concentration. This study provides new information on correlates of diet patterns in Indian children and how diet relates to nutritional status. Follow-up of these children will be important to determine the role of these differences in diet in the development of risk factors for NCD including body composition.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2013 The Authors
ISSN: 1740-8709
Project Funding Details:
Funded Project NameProject IDFunding Body
Not SetNot SetParthenon Trust
Not SetNot SetWellcome Trust
Not SetNot SetMedical Research Council
Keywords: India; child; chronic disease; diet pattern; nutritional status
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS) > Health, Wellbeing and Social Care > Health and Social Care
Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS) > Health, Wellbeing and Social Care
Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS)
Research Group: International Development & Inclusive Innovation
Item ID: 46339
Depositing User: Aravinda Guntupalli
Date Deposited: 19 May 2016 14:13
Last Modified: 10 Dec 2018 22:26
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/46339
Share this page:

Metrics

Altmetrics from Altmetric

Citations from Dimensions

Download history for this item

These details should be considered as only a guide to the number of downloads performed manually. Algorithmic methods have been applied in an attempt to remove automated downloads from the displayed statistics but no guarantee can be made as to the accuracy of the figures.

Actions (login may be required)

Policies | Disclaimer

© The Open University   contact the OU