The Open UniversitySkip to content
 

Women investors, 'that nasty South Sea affair', and the rage to speculate in early eighteenth-century England

Laurence, Anne (2006). Women investors, 'that nasty South Sea affair', and the rage to speculate in early eighteenth-century England. Accounting, Business and Financial History, 16(2) pp. 245–264.

DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09585200600756274
Google Scholar: Look up in Google Scholar

Abstract

The excursions of the five unmarried Hastings sisters and their widowed friend Jane Bonnell into the stock market show how changes in the availability of credit and the services offered by banks in the early eighteenth century had an impact on ordinary citizens. At the time of the South Sea Bubble all six bought South Sea shares through their bank. But their trading activities and investment strategies differed and had different outcomes, showing there are no easy associations between gender and ideas of risk or safe investment.

Item Type: Journal Article
ISSN: 0958-5206
Keywords: women; South Sea Bubble; stock market; Hoare's Bank; Lady Betty Hastings; Jane Bonnell
Academic Unit/Department: Arts > History
Item ID: 4632
Depositing User: Anne Laurence
Date Deposited: 10 Jul 2006
Last Modified: 02 Dec 2010 19:52
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/4632
Share this page:

Actions (login may be required)

View Item
Report issue / request change

Policies | Disclaimer

© The Open University   + 44 (0)870 333 4340   general-enquiries@open.ac.uk