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Unity and fragmentation of the habitus

Silva, Elizabeth B. (2016). Unity and fragmentation of the habitus. The Sociological Review, 64(1) pp. 166–183.

DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-954X.12346
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Abstract

This paper examines a unitary notion of the habitus present in Bourdieu’s early works and its transformation along his sociological career, to later conceptions of a fragmented habitus concept to examine contemporary relationality and social change. The career of the concept of habitus in Bourdieu shows that interplays of habitus and fields are seen to demand increasing labour of integration from individuals as social life becomes more differentiated. The paper claims the need for sociology to engage with field analyses to advance explorations of the habitus and to acknowledge the potential pliability of the concept. It is suggested that sociology may adopt the psychoanalytic notion of ‘standing in spaces’ (and associated notions of ‘liminality’ and experiences in interstitial positions) for a productive development of the notion of fragmented habitus, and to enhance proposals that view the social with a history that is made available to humans to change.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2016 Sociological Review Publication Limited
ISSN: 0038-0261
Keywords: unitary habitus; fragmented habitus; Bourdieu; social change; multiple relational matrices
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > History, Religious Studies, Sociology, Social Policy and Criminology
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Citizenship, Identities and Governance (CCIG)
Item ID: 45921
Depositing User: Elizabeth Silva
Date Deposited: 06 Apr 2016 10:23
Last Modified: 03 Nov 2016 01:06
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/45921
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