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Poverty in Scotland 2016: Tools for Transformation

Mooney, Gerry; McKendrick, John; Scott, Gill; Dickie, Peter and McHardy, Fiona eds. (2016). Poverty in Scotland 2016: Tools for Transformation. Poverty in Scotland. London: Child Poverty Action Group.

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Abstract

Poverty in Scotland 2016, the latest edition in a now well-established series, provides an indispensable and authoritative overview of the poverty and anti-poverty policies that form the context for a newly elected Scottish Parliament set to enjoy significant new powers.

In a comprehensive, yet accessible, account of the state of poverty in Scotland, the main trends are highlighted and explained, and an account given of how that poverty is experienced.

Drawing on the latest data and contributions from a range of academic, third sector and practitioner experts, the book explores:

• how poverty is defined and measured
• what causes poverty in Scotland
• trends in the levels of poverty experienced
• the impact of poverty on individuals, families and communities across Scotland
• the extent to which key ‘tools’ – such as work, social security, housing, health and education – have been, and could be, used to transform Scotland towards a poverty-free country.

Item Type: Edited Book
Copyright Holders: 2016 CPAG
ISBN: 1-910715-18-2, 978-1-910715-18-5
Keywords: Scotland; poverty; inequality; austerity
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > History, Religious Studies, Sociology, Social Policy and Criminology
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Harm and Evidence Research Collaborative (HERC)
International Centre for Comparative Criminological Research (ICCCR)
OpenSpace Research Centre (OSRC)
Related URLs:
Item ID: 45864
Depositing User: Gerry Mooney
Date Deposited: 04 Apr 2016 08:59
Last Modified: 02 Oct 2017 10:25
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/45864
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