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Mutational analysis of Polycomb genes in solid tumours identifies PHC3 amplification as a possible cancer-driving genetic alteration.

Crea, F.; Sun, L.; Pikor, L.; Frumento, P.; Lam, W. L. and Helgason, C. D. (2013). Mutational analysis of Polycomb genes in solid tumours identifies PHC3 amplification as a possible cancer-driving genetic alteration. British Journal of Cancer, 109(6) pp. 1699–1702.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1038/bjc.2013.454
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Abstract

Background: Polycomb group genes (PcGs) are epigenetic effectors implicated in most cancer hallmarks. The mutational status of all PcGs has never been systematically assessed in solid tumours.

Methods: We conducted a multi-step analysis on publically available databases and patient samples to identify somatic aberrations of PcGs.

Results: Data from more than 1000 cancer patients show for the first time that the PcG member PHC3 is amplified in three epithelial neoplasms (rate: 8–35%). This aberration predicts poorer prognosis in lung and uterine carcinomas (Po0.01). Gene amplification correlates with mRNA overexpression (Po0.01), suggesting a functional role of this aberration.

Conclusion: PHC3 amplification may emerge as a biomarker and potential therapeutic target in a relevant fraction of epithelial tumours.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2013 Cancer Research UK.
ISSN: 1532-1827
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Life, Health and Chemical Sciences
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Item ID: 45789
Depositing User: Francesco Crea
Date Deposited: 13 May 2016 08:32
Last Modified: 09 Dec 2018 17:19
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/45789
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