The Open UniversitySkip to content
 

Zinc-imidazolate polymers (ZIPs) as a potential carrier to brain capillary endothelial cells

Chiacchia, M.; Cerutti, C.; Gromnicova, R.; Rietdorf, K.; Romero, I.A. and Bradshaw, D. (2015). Zinc-imidazolate polymers (ZIPs) as a potential carrier to brain capillary endothelial cells. Journal of Materials Chemistry B, 3(46) pp. 9053–9059.

Full text available as:
[img]
Preview
PDF (Version of Record) - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (1MB) | Preview
DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1039/C5TB01814E
Google Scholar: Look up in Google Scholar

Abstract

Herein, we report the synthesis and characterization of nanospheres of a biodegradable zinc-imidazolate polymers (ZIPs) as a proof-of-concept delivery vehicle into human brain endothelial cells, the main component of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The ZIP particles can readily encapsulate functional molecules such as fluorophores and inorganic nanoparticles at the point of synthesis producing stable colloidal dispersions. Our results show that these biodegradable particles are not cytotoxic, and are able to penetrate and release cargo species to human brain capillary endothelial cells in vitro thus exhibiting significant potential as a novel platform for brain targeting treatments.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2015 Royal Society of Chemistry
ISSN: 2050-750X
Project Funding Details:
Funded Project NameProject IDFunding Body
Not SetERC-2010-StG-258613-BIOMOFEuropean Research Council
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Life, Health and Chemical Sciences
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Biomedical Research Network (BRN)
Item ID: 45725
Depositing User: Radka Gromnicova
Date Deposited: 18 Mar 2016 16:02
Last Modified: 17 May 2017 05:26
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/45725
Share this page:

Altmetrics

Download history for this item

These details should be considered as only a guide to the number of downloads performed manually. Algorithmic methods have been applied in an attempt to remove automated downloads from the displayed statistics but no guarantee can be made as to the accuracy of the figures.

Actions (login may be required)

Policies | Disclaimer

© The Open University   + 44 (0)870 333 4340   general-enquiries@open.ac.uk