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Integers, integrants and normative vectors: The limitations of environmental policy integration under neoloberalism

Humphreys, David (2016). Integers, integrants and normative vectors: The limitations of environmental policy integration under neoloberalism. Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy, 34 pp. 433–447.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1177/0263774X15614721
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Abstract

Policy integration is a processes by which a particular policy, and the objectives, principles and values on which it is based, is intentionally integrated into a whole – a broader and more holistic set of policies – where the former did not previously exist. We may call this whole the integer, a term used in mathematics for a whole number. The integer denotes the broader set of policies of a polity or political system and the set of instruments used to promote and implement these policies. We may call that which is to be integrated the integrant, a term used to denote a part of a whole. The integrant may be defined as a particular policy and the set of instruments used to promote and implement that policy which, it is intended, should be integrated into an integer. So environmental policy integration is a policy process to integrate a stipulated integrant (an environmental policy) throughout an integer (a broader set of policies). Environmental policy integration is first and foremost a normative enterprise that seeks to shift the normative vector (the overall normative ‘pull’) of the integer on to a more sustainable basis. However, the extent to which environmental policy integration can be successful in doing this is limited when integrants are shaped and influenced ab initio by the principles and values of the integer. The paper argues that contemporary environmental policies are dominated primarily by neoliberal principles. The result is that while environmental policy integration has achieved some limited successes it is an essentially reformist approach that takes as its point of departure mainstream policies that routinely degrade the environment.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: Environment and Planning C
ISSN: 1472-3425
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Politics, Philosophy, Economics, Development, Geography
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: OpenSpace Research Centre (OSRC)
Item ID: 45476
Depositing User: David Humphreys
Date Deposited: 29 Feb 2016 11:12
Last Modified: 05 Oct 2016 12:24
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/45476
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