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The Celtic Languages in the Age of Globalisation: Problems and Possibilities [In Russian]

Bissell, Christopher (2015). The Celtic Languages in the Age of Globalisation: Problems and Possibilities [In Russian]. ВЕСТНИК ЧУВАШСКОГО ОТДЕЛЕНИЯ РОССИЙСКОГО ФИЛОСОФСКОГО ОБЩЕСТВА, 7 pp. 160–170.

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Abstract

The article discusses the current state of Celtic languages ​​in the UK and Republic of Ireland, as affected by recent developments in globalization and devolution. After a brief history, the current position of the lanuages Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic is discussed. The importance of the influence of the media is considered, paricularly developments in ICT.

Item Type: Journal Item
ISSN: 2306-5370
Extra Information: The associated downloadable file is the original English text, published in Russian translation.
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Computing and Communications
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Item ID: 45104
Depositing User: Christopher Bissell
Date Deposited: 11 Jan 2016 11:49
Last Modified: 11 Jan 2018 16:22
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/45104
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