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Are pharmaceutical industry associations an underutilised partner in health delivery governance and innovation systems in developing countries?

Papaioannou, Theo; Watkins, Andrew and Kale, Dinar (2015). Are pharmaceutical industry associations an underutilised partner in health delivery governance and innovation systems in developing countries? In: Development Studies Association Annual Conference 2015, 7-8 September 2015, University of Bath.

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Abstract

Integrating political, industrial and healthcare systems has been a major challenge for politics of innovation and development in low and middle income countries. This challenge has so far been understood in terms of separate industrial and health related innovation policies without paying adequate attention to the institutional roles of biopharmaceutical and other umbrella associations. This paper seeks to examine such roles in the developmental contexts of South Africa and India. The argument put forward is that in both countries biopharmaceutical and umbrella associations have evolved from lobbying organisations to institutional partners who influence the politics of innovation and development, and therefore the degree of integration and fragmentation of political, industrial and health innovation systems.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item
Copyright Holders: 2015 The Authors
Keywords: industry associations; innovation; development; health systems; integration; India; South Africa
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Politics, Philosophy, Economics, Development, Geography
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Citizenship, Identities and Governance (CCIG)
Innovation, Knowledge & Development research centre (IKD)
OpenSpace Research Centre (OSRC)
International Development & Inclusive Innovation
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Item ID: 44610
Depositing User: Theo Papaioannou
Date Deposited: 22 Oct 2015 08:30
Last Modified: 04 Sep 2017 09:08
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/44610
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