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The Politics of In/visibility: Being There

Woodward, Kath (2015). The Politics of In/visibility: Being There. Genders and Sexualities in the Social Sciences. Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan.

URL: http://www.palgrave.com/page/detail/the-politics-o...
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Abstract

Visibility and being seen to be there matters in contemporary society. This book explores the politics of looking and being seen, and suggests new ways of understanding the gaze as relational and embodied. It uses a variety of examples; from sport, with its distinction between the authenticity of the real fan who is there in the flesh and the spectator who watches online or on television; from film and theatre; and from the sexualized images of popular culture. In doing so, it explores the relationship between enfleshed selves, cultural forms and the inner world of feelings, which can sometimes take you out of time and into 'the zone'. Is being present in the flesh more important, and more real, than looking at a distance? What is the relationship between the actual and the virtual? The book grapples with these questions, concluding that, just as women are very visible but lack the power to influence how they are seen, you can be there but still be invisible.

Item Type: Book
Copyright Holders: 2015 Kath Woodward
ISBN: 0-230-30255-6, 978-0-230-30255-6
Project Funding Details:
Funded Project NameProject IDFunding Body
Being in the Zone: the importune of peak performance in Sport, Art and WorkNot SetAHRC
Keywords: being there; relational gaze; psychosocial; sexual politics; in the zone
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Social Sciences and Global Studies > Sociology
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Social Sciences and Global Studies
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
Item ID: 44437
Depositing User: Kath Woodward
Date Deposited: 08 Oct 2015 08:27
Last Modified: 06 Aug 2019 08:47
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/44437
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