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Mobile Learning: location, collaboration and scaffolding inquiry

Scanlon, Eileen (2014). Mobile Learning: location, collaboration and scaffolding inquiry. In: Ally, Mohamed and Tsinakos, Avgoustos eds. Increasing Access through Mobile Learning. Perspectives on Open and Distance Learning. Vancouver: Commonwealth of Learning, pp. 85–98.

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URL: http://oasis.col.org/handle/11599/558
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Abstract

Critiques of mobile learning pedagogy are concerned with whether such approaches are technology led. This chapter discusses how the particular features of mobile learning can be harnessed to provide new learning opportunities in relation to collaboration, inquiry and location-based learning. Technology supported inquiry learning is a situation rich with possibilities for collaboration. In particular, mobile learning offers new possibilities for scaffolding collaboration together with its other better-known features such as scaffolding the transfer between settings and making learning relevant by making use of the possibilities of location-based learning. These features are considered as part of mobile learning models, in particular mobile collaborative learning models.

Item Type: Book Section
Copyright Holders: 2014 Commonwealth of Learning and Athabasca University.
ISBN: 1-894975-64-2, 978-1-894975-64-3
Keywords: mobile learning; location based learning; collaboration
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS)
Research Group: Centre for Research in Education and Educational Technology (CREET)
Item ID: 44393
Depositing User: Eileen Scanlon
Date Deposited: 07 Oct 2015 09:35
Last Modified: 10 May 2019 11:03
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/44393
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