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Implementation dynamics for CRM system development

Corner, Ian and Hinton, Matthew (2015). Implementation dynamics for CRM system development. In: British Academy of Management Conference Proceedings 2015, British Academy of Management.

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Abstract

This paper considers the implementation of CRM systems based on evidence from longitudinal case studies in medium-sized companies operating in the business-to-business sector. This research addresses systems implementation from two key perspectives. These are 1) the emergence of risks to implementations from an organizational context rather than a technological context and 2) the emergence of unwritten/unconscious strategies that contribute to the achievement of implementation success. An immersive case study approach is employed where video data is used to capture key phases of the implementation process. Analysis suggests that a set of four implicit contracts exist between the main actors, leading to a successful implementation, despite other failures. These ‘contracts’ are believed to make a positive contribution for CRM implementation practitioners by mitigating some of the ongoing organizational risks.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item
Copyright Holders: 2015 The Authors
ISBN: 0-9549608-8-2, 978-0-9549608-8-9
Keywords: CRM; system implementation; e-business; risk resolution
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Business and Law (FBL) > Business > Department for Public Leadership and Social Enterprise
Faculty of Business and Law (FBL) > Business
Faculty of Business and Law (FBL)
Related URLs:
Item ID: 44347
Depositing User: Matthew Hinton
Date Deposited: 15 Sep 2015 08:28
Last Modified: 07 Dec 2018 18:59
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/44347
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