The Open UniversitySkip to content
 

Ex-orbitant globality

Clark, Nigel (2005). Ex-orbitant globality. Theory, Culture & Society, 22(5) pp. 165–185.

Full text available as:
[img]
Preview
PDF (Not Set) - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (202Kb)
DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: http://doi.org/10.1177/0263276405057198
Google Scholar: Look up in Google Scholar

Abstract

Social theorists, drawing on the study of complex dynamical systems to address global processes, tend to evoke an immanent globality devoid of a constitutive otherness or outside. However, as well as dealing with the internal dynamics of systems, complexity studies point to the mutual implication of systems and their surroundings: a concern that resonates with the interest in the convolutions of the inside–outside relationship prominent in post-structural philosophies. This article, looking at theories about the dynamical characteristics of the solar system, galaxy and universe, develops the idea of an ex-orbitant globality that treats the earth as a system in active and ongoing interchange with its cosmic environment. A sense of the inevitable excess and unpredictability that attends this openness to the cosmos and to further other-than-human influences, it is suggested, has repercussions for the way we respond to environmental change injecting an element of abyssal undecidability into all our deliberations.

Item Type: Journal Article
ISSN: 1460-3616
Keywords: complexity; cosmology; globalization; otherness; responsibility
Academic Unit/Department: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Politics, Philosophy, Economics, Development, Geography
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: OpenSpace Research Centre (OSRC)
Item ID: 4405
Depositing User: Users 13 not found.
Date Deposited: 06 Jul 2006
Last Modified: 04 Oct 2016 15:36
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/4405
Share this page:

Altmetrics

Scopus Citations

Download history for this item

These details should be considered as only a guide to the number of downloads performed manually. Algorithmic methods have been applied in an attempt to remove automated downloads from the displayed statistics but no guarantee can be made as to the accuracy of the figures.

▼ Automated document suggestions from open access sources

Actions (login may be required)

Policies | Disclaimer

© The Open University   + 44 (0)870 333 4340   general-enquiries@open.ac.uk