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Stability and change in the mental health of New Zealand secondary school students 2007–2012: Results from the national adolescent health surveys

Fleming, Theresa M.; Clark, Terryann; Denny, Simon; Bullen, Pat; Crengle, Sue; Peiris-John, Roshini; Robinson, Elizabeth; Rossen, Fiona V.; Sheridan, Janie and Lucassen, Mathjis (2014). Stability and change in the mental health of New Zealand secondary school students 2007–2012: Results from the national adolescent health surveys. Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 48(5) pp. 472–480.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1177/0004867413514489
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Abstract

Objective: To describe the self-reported mental health of New Zealand secondary school students in 2012 and to investigate changes between 2007 and 2012.

Methods: Nationally representative health and wellbeing surveys of students were completed in 2007 (n=9107) and 2012 (n=8500). Logistic regressions were used to examine the associations between mental health and changes over time. Prevalence data and adjusted odds ratios are presented.

Results: In 2012, approximately three-quarters (76.2%, 95% CI 74.8–77.5) of students reported good overall wellbeing. By contrast (also in 2012), some students reported self-harming (24.0%, 95% CI 22.7–25.4), depressive symptoms (12.8%, 95% CI 11.6–13.9), 2 weeks of low mood (31%, 95% CI 29.7–32.5), suicidal ideation (15.7%, 95% 14.5–17.0), and suicide attempts (4.5%, 95% CI 3.8–5.2). Between 2007 and 2012, there appeared to be slight increases in the proportions of students reporting an episode of low mood (OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.06–1.23, p=0.0009), depressive symptoms (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.03–1.30, p=0.011), and using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire - emotional symptoms (OR 1.38, 95% CI 1.23–1.54, p<0.0001), hyperactivity (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.05–1.29, p=0.0051), and peer problems (OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.09–1.49, p=0.0022). The proportion of students aged 16 years or older reporting self-harm increased slightly between surveys, but there was little change for students aged 15 years or less (OR 1.29, 95% CI 1.15–1.44 and OR 1.10, 95% 0.98–1.23, respectively, p=0.0078). There were no changes in reported suicidal ideation and suicide attempts between 2007 and 2012. However, there has been an improvement in self-reported conduct problems since 2007 (OR 0.78, 95% CI 0.70–0.87, p<0.0001).

Conclusions: The findings suggest a slight decline in aspects of self-reported mental health amongst New Zealand secondary school students between 2007 and 2012. There is a need for ongoing monitoring and for evidence-based, accessible interventions that prevent mental ill health and promote psychological wellbeing.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists
ISSN: 1440-1614
Keywords: adolescent; depression; deliberate self-harm; mental health; Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire; suicide attempts; wellbeing
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS) > Health, Wellbeing and Social Care > Health and Social Care
Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS) > Health, Wellbeing and Social Care
Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS)
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Item ID: 43964
Depositing User: Mathijs Lucassen
Date Deposited: 11 Aug 2015 14:16
Last Modified: 08 Dec 2018 21:20
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/43964
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