The Open UniversitySkip to content
 

The views of lesbian, gay and bisexual youth regarding computerised self-help for depression: An exploratory study

Lucassen, Mathijs F. G.; Hatcher, Simon; Stasiak, Karolina; Fleming, Theresa; Shepherd, Matthew and Merry, Sally N. (2013). The views of lesbian, gay and bisexual youth regarding computerised self-help for depression: An exploratory study. Advances in Mental Health: Promotion, Prevention and Early Intervention, 12(1) pp. 22–34.

Full text available as:
[img]
Preview
PDF (Accepted Manuscript) - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (675kB) | Preview
DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.5172/jamh.2013.12.1.22
Google Scholar: Look up in Google Scholar

Abstract

Background: Lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) youth with depression are often isolated and face the double stigma of mental ill-health and being non-heterosexual. Computerised Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (cCBT) offers a means of providing these youth with evidence-based self-help that is confidential and can be accessed privately. We created a cCBT resource for youth generally and wished to explore what alterations, if any, might be needed to make it acceptable and relevant to LGB youth.

Method: Three focus groups were conducted with LGB young people (56% female, aged 16–27 years) from two LGB youth organisations in New Zealand. We used the general inductive approach to: Explore the issues faced by LGB youth; and, their views about prototypes of a cCBT program (SPARX).

Results: Participants reported a number of challenges from living in a homophobic and gender-stereotyped world and they recommended that these be incorporated in a cCBT program addressing depression for LGB youth. Participants were mainly positive about the idea of cCBT and the prototypes of the program; however, they made suggestions to ensure that the program was relevant and appealing to them.

Conclusion: Prototypes of a ‘generic’ cCBT program did not address all the issues that LGB youth face. It proved feasible to adapt a cCBT program to take this feedback into account, and this led to the creation of Rainbow SPARX. The makers of e-therapy interventions should actively involve and respond to the views of consumers.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2013 eContent Management Pty Ltd.
ISSN: 1838-7357
Project Funding Details:
Funded Project NameProject IDFunding Body
PhD Studentship (Senior Health Research PhD Scholarship)Not SetUniversity of Auckland
Keywords: lesbian, gay, bisexual, cognitive behavioural therapy
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS) > Health, Wellbeing and Social Care > Health and Social Care
Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS) > Health, Wellbeing and Social Care
Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS)
Item ID: 43963
Depositing User: Mathijs Lucassen
Date Deposited: 11 Aug 2015 14:41
Last Modified: 07 Dec 2018 10:42
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/43963
Share this page:

Metrics

Altmetrics from Altmetric

Citations from Dimensions

Download history for this item

These details should be considered as only a guide to the number of downloads performed manually. Algorithmic methods have been applied in an attempt to remove automated downloads from the displayed statistics but no guarantee can be made as to the accuracy of the figures.

Actions (login may be required)

Policies | Disclaimer

© The Open University   contact the OU