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Education in the working-class home: modes of learning as revealed by nineteenth-century criminal records

Crone, Rosalind (2015). Education in the working-class home: modes of learning as revealed by nineteenth-century criminal records. Oxford Review of Education, 41(4) pp. 482–500.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1080/03054985.2015.1048116
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Abstract

The transmission of knowledge and skills within the working-class household greatly troubled social commentators and social policy experts during the first half of the nineteenth century. To prove theories which related criminality to failures in working-class up-bringing, experts and officials embarked upon an ambitious collection of data on incarcerated criminals at various penal institutions. One such institution was the County Gaol at Ipswich. The exceptionally detailed information that survives on families, literacy, education and apprenticeships of the men, women and children imprisoned there has the potential to transform our understanding of the nature of home schooling (broadly interpreted) amongst the working classes in nineteenth-century England. This article uses data sets from prison registers to chart both the incidence and ‘success’ of instruction in reading and writing within the domestic environment. In the process, it highlights the importance of schooling in working-class families, but also the potentially growing significance of the family in occupational training.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2015 Taylor & Francis
ISSN: 1465-3915
Project Funding Details:
Funded Project NameProject IDFunding Body
Mapping the education of the poor in nineteenth-century SuffolkA-11-073-RCMarc Fitch Fund
Extra Information: Special Issue: Home education 1750–1900: domestic pedagogies in England and Wales in historical perspective
Keywords: literacy; crime; apprenticeship; labourers; artisans; Suffolk; accomplices; prisons
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > History, Religious Studies, Sociology, Social Policy and Criminology
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Harm and Evidence Research Collaborative (HERC)
Item ID: 43616
Depositing User: Rosalind Crone
Date Deposited: 06 Jul 2015 08:45
Last Modified: 07 Sep 2017 09:26
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/43616
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