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Principles of a micro squeeze flow rheometer for the analysis of extremely small volumes of liquid

Cheneler, D.; Bowen, J.; Ward, M. C. L. and Adams, M. J. (2011). Principles of a micro squeeze flow rheometer for the analysis of extremely small volumes of liquid. Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, 21(4), article no. 045030.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1088/0960-1317/21/4/045030
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Abstract

In this paper, the analysis and design of a piezoelectrically actuated micro squeeze flow rheometer (MSFR) is presented. The fabrication of a simple prototype is described and initial experiments show the validity of the theory presented. The rheometer requires small volumes of liquid of the order of 1–10 nL and extends the frequency range an order of magnitude beyond that possible using conventional cone and plate rheometry. The electrodes of the piezoelectric disc which are used to actuate the rheometer have been patterned to allow the simultaneous measurement of the induced voltage, the phase and amplitude of which is then used to calculate the storage and loss moduli of the fluid being tested.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2011 IOP Publishing Ltd
ISSN: 1361-6439
Extra Information: 14 pp.
Keywords: soft matter; liquids; polymers; fluid dynamics; rheometry
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Engineering and Innovation
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
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Item ID: 43186
Depositing User: James Bowen
Date Deposited: 02 Jun 2015 09:56
Last Modified: 11 Nov 2016 06:44
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/43186
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