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Controlling thin liquid film viscosity via modification of substrate surface chemistry

Bowen, James; Cheneler, David and Adams, Michael J. (2013). Controlling thin liquid film viscosity via modification of substrate surface chemistry. Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, 418 pp. 112–116.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.colsurfa.2012.11.013
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Abstract

The viscosity of thin films of liquid poly(dimethylsiloxane) have been studied on silicon and fluoropolymer-coated silicon by means of a perturbation technique applied using colloid probe atomic force microscopy. The liquid film supported by a silicon substrate exhibited a greater viscosity than the bulk liquid, due to the strong interaction between the molecules near to the liquid/solid interface. In comparison, the liquid film supported by a fluoropolymer-coated substrate exhibited a similar viscosity to the bulk liquid, due to the weak interaction between the liquid and the fluoropolymer surface. This demonstrates the possibility to control the viscosity of thin liquid films via selection of the substrate chemical properties.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2012 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN: 0927-7757
Keywords: poly(dimethylsiloxane); thin film; viscosity; fluoropolymer; atomic force microscopy
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Engineering and Innovation
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Item ID: 43168
Depositing User: James Bowen
Date Deposited: 04 Jun 2015 10:03
Last Modified: 22 Nov 2016 19:45
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/43168
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