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Effects of current on early stages of focused ion beam nano-machining

Sabouri, Aydin; Anthony, Carl J.; Prewett, Philip D.; Bowen, James and Butt, Haider (2015). Effects of current on early stages of focused ion beam nano-machining. Materials Research Express, 2(5)

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1088/2053-1591/2/5/055005
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Abstract

In this report we investigate the effects of focused ion beam machining at low doses in the range of 1015–1016 ions cm-2 for currents below 300 pA on Si(100) substrates. The effects of similar doses with currents in the range 10–300 pA were compared. The topography of resulting structures has been characterized using atomic force microscope, while crystallinity of the Si was assessed by means of Raman spectroscopy. These machining parameters allow a controllable preparation of structures either protruding from, or recessed into, the surface with nanometre precision.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2015 IOP Publishing Ltd
ISSN: 2053-1591
Extra Information: 8 pp.
Keywords: focused ion beam; atomic force microscopy; Raman spectroscopy
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Engineering and Innovation
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Item ID: 42774
Depositing User: James Bowen
Date Deposited: 15 May 2015 08:28
Last Modified: 17 May 2017 17:53
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/42774
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