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Thermodynamic properties of phase separation in shear flow

Qin, R. S. (2015). Thermodynamic properties of phase separation in shear flow. Computers & Fluids, 117 pp. 11–16.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compfluid.2015.04.024
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Abstract

The steady state thermodynamic properties of a binary-phase shear fluid are studied quantitatively using the compressible lattice Boltzmann BGK theory with mesoscopic inter-particle potentials. For the Newtonian van der Waals fluid, numerical calculation shows that the effect of boundary shear on steady state phase diagram of immiscible phases is negligible when the fluid is not in the near-critical region. Streamlines show no penetration of macroscopic flow through the interface to cause the mass density shift even when the boundary shear velocities are significant. The deformation of the droplets depends on the shear rate and interfacial energy but the change of phase diagram during deformation is negligible. In the near critical region, however, shear causes significant derivation in the phase diagram.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2015 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN: 0045-7930
Project Funding Details:
Funded Project NameProject IDFunding Body
Not SetNot SetRoyal Academy of Engineering
Not SetNot SetTATA Steel Ltd.
UK Consortium on Mesoscale Engineering Sciences (UKCOMES)EP/L00030X/1EPSRC
Keywords: phase separation; phase equilibrium; lattice Boltzmann equation; mesoscopic interparticle potentials
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Engineering and Innovation
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Item ID: 42757
Depositing User: Rongshan Qin
Date Deposited: 13 May 2015 15:52
Last Modified: 23 May 2017 09:55
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/42757
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