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Microparticles in multiple sclerosis and clinically isolated syndrome: effect on endothelial barrier function.

Marcos-Ramiro, Beatriz; Oliva Nacarino, Pedro; Serrano-Pertierra, Esther; Blanco-Gelaz, Miguel Ángel; Weksler, Babette B.; Romero, Ignacio A.; Couraud, Pierre O.; Tuñón, Alberto; López-Larrea, Carlos; Millán, Jaime and Cernuda-Morollón, Eva (2014). Microparticles in multiple sclerosis and clinically isolated syndrome: effect on endothelial barrier function. BMC Neuroscience, 15, article no. 110.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2202-15-110
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Abstract

Background
Cell-derived microparticles are secreted in response to cell damage or dysfunction. Endothelial and platelet dysfunction are thought to contribute to the development of multiple sclerosis (MS). Our aim here is, first, to compare the presence of microparticles of endothelial and platelet origin in plasma from patients with different clinical forms of MS and with clinically isolated syndrome. Second, to investigate the effect of microparticles on endothelial barrier function.

Results
Platelet-poor plasma from 95 patients (12 with clinically isolated syndrome, 51 relapsing-remitting, 23 secondary progressive, 9 primary progressive) and 49 healthy controls were analyzed for the presence of platelet-derived and endothelium-derived microparticles by flow cytometry. The plasma concentration of platelet-derived and endothelium-derived microparticles increased in all clinical forms of MS and in clinically isolated syndrome versus controls. The response of endothelial barriers to purified microparticles was measured by electric cell-substrate impedance sensing. Microparticles from relapsing-remitting MS patients induced, at equivalent concentrations, a stronger disruption of endothelial barriers than those from healthy donors or from patients with clinically isolated syndrome. MS microparticles acted synergistically with the inflammatory mediator thrombin to disrupt the endothelial barrier function.

Conclusions
Plasma microparticles should be considered not only as markers of early stages of MS, but also as pathological factors with the potential to increase endothelial permeability and leukocyte infiltration.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2014 Marcos-Ramiro et al.
ISSN: 1471-2202
Extra Information: 15 pp.
Keywords: multiple sclerosis; clinically isolated syndrome; microparticles; endothelial barrier function; thrombin
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Life, Health and Chemical Sciences
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Item ID: 42431
Depositing User: Ignacio A Romero
Date Deposited: 13 Apr 2015 10:33
Last Modified: 10 Dec 2018 20:55
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/42431
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