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Display blindness? Looking again at the visibility of situated displays using eye tracking

Dalton, Nicholas; Collins, Emily and Marshall, Paul (2015). Display blindness? Looking again at the visibility of situated displays using eye tracking. In: 33th International Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2015, ACM, pp. 3889–3898.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1145/2702123.2702150
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Abstract

Observational studies of situated displays have suggested that they are rarely looked at, and when they are it is typically only for a short period of time. Using a mobile eye tracker during a realistic shopping task in a shopping center, we show that people look at displays more than would be predicted from these observational studies, but still only short glances and often from quite far away. We characterize the patterns of eye-movements that precede looking at a display and discuss some of the design implications for the design of situated display technologies that are deployed in public space.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item
Copyright Holders: 2015 ACM
ISBN: 1-4503-3145-9, 978-1-4503-3145-6
Keywords: public displays; architecture; eye tracking; display blindness
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Computing and Communications
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Research Group: Centre for Research in Computing (CRC)
Related URLs:
Item ID: 42236
Depositing User: Nicholas Dalton
Date Deposited: 05 Mar 2015 10:54
Last Modified: 04 Oct 2016 15:30
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/42236
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