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Functional and physiological changes associated with posture and postural stability in aging

Jančová, Jitka and Kohlíková, Eva (2008). Functional and physiological changes associated with posture and postural stability in aging. International Journal of Health Science, 1(2) pp. 61–68.

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Abstract

As more individuals live longer, it becomes more and more important to determine the extant and mechanisms by which we can improve health, functional capacity, quality of life and independence of living alone in the population of elders. The current research of aging has analysed with the use of modern technologies the value of numerous variables that influence the manner we age, as biological systems that affect the process of aging. A factor called functional independence is of great importance in the quality of life of elderly. Functional independence may be defined as the ability to conduct activities of daily living without difficulty. This factor tends to be diminished in advanced aging, for a variety of reasons including phsyiologic and psychologic changes. The present study reviews and discusses the process of physiological aging in association with changes of posture and Postural Stability in the elderly.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2008 Not known
ISSN: 1791-4299
Keywords: posture; aging; human physiology; quality of life; older people; physical education; sports and recreation instruction; health and welfare funds; falls; frail elderly; postural stability
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS) > Health, Wellbeing and Social Care > Health and Social Care
Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS) > Health, Wellbeing and Social Care
Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS)
Item ID: 41259
Depositing User: Jitka Vseteckova
Date Deposited: 07 Nov 2014 09:41
Last Modified: 07 Dec 2018 10:26
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/41259
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