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Effects of mental health self-efficacy on outcomes of a mobile phone and web intervention for mild-to-moderate depression, anxiety and stress: secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial.

Clarke, Janine; Proudfoot, Judith; Birch, Mary Rose; Whitton, Alexis E.; Parker, Gordon; Manicavasagar, Vijaya; Harrison, Virginia; Christensen, Helen and Hadzi-Pavlovic, Dusan (2014). Effects of mental health self-efficacy on outcomes of a mobile phone and web intervention for mild-to-moderate depression, anxiety and stress: secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial. BMC Psychiatry, 14(1), article no. 272.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12888-014-0272-1
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Abstract

Background: Online psychotherapy is clinically effective yet why, how, and for whom the effects are greatest remain largely unknown. In the present study, we examined whether mental health self-efficacy (MHSE), a construct derived from Bandura’s Social Learning Theory (SLT), influenced symptom and functional outcomes of a new mobile phone and web-based psychotherapy intervention for people with mild-to-moderate depression, anxiety and stress.

Methods: STUDY I: Data from 49 people with symptoms of depression, anxiety and/or stress in the mild-to-moderate range were used to examine the reliability and construct validity of a new measure of MHSE, the Mental Health Self-efficacy Scale (MHSES). STUDY II: We conducted a secondary analysis of data from a recently completed randomised controlled trial (N = 720) to evaluate whether MHSE effected post-intervention outcomes, as measured by the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS) and Work and Social Adjustment Scale (WSAS), for people with symptoms in the mild-to-moderate range.

Results: STUDY I: The data established that the MHSES comprised a unitary factor, with acceptable internal reliability (Cronbach’s alpha = .89) and construct validity. STUDY II: The intervention group showed significantly greater improvement in MHSE at post-intervention relative to the control conditions (p’s < = .000). MHSE mediated the effects of the intervention on anxiety and stress symptoms. Furthermore, people with low pre-treatment MHSE reported the greatest post-intervention gains in depression, anxiety and overall distress. No effects were found for MHSE on work and social functioning.

Conclusion: Mental health self-efficacy influences symptom outcomes of a self-guided mobile phone and web-based psychotherapeutic intervention and may itself be a worthwhile target to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of online treatment programs.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2014 The Authors
ISSN: 1471-244X
Project Funding Details:
Funded Project NameProject IDFunding Body
Not SetNot SetAustralian Government Department of Health and Ageing
Not Set510135National Health and Medical Research Council
Extra Information: 10 pp.
Keywords: eHealth; depression; anxiety; psychological stress; self-efficacy; mobile health; intervention studies; work functioning
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Psychology
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Policing Research and Learning (CPRL)
Harm and Evidence Research Collaborative (HERC)
Item ID: 41136
Depositing User: Virginia Harrison
Date Deposited: 17 Oct 2014 14:34
Last Modified: 01 Dec 2016 06:51
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/41136
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