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Controls on the 87Sr/86Sr ratios of carbonates in the Garhwal Himalaya, Headwaters of the Ganges

Bickle, M.J.; Harris, N. B. W.; Bunbury, J.M.; Chapman, H.J.; Fairchild, I.J. and Ahmad, T. (2001). Controls on the 87Sr/86Sr ratios of carbonates in the Garhwal Himalaya, Headwaters of the Ganges. Journal of Geology, 109(6) pp. 737–753.

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Abstract

The episodic variation of the seawater 87Sr/86Sr ratio has been attributed to either variations in the Sr flux or the Sr-isotopic composition of the riverine-dissolved load derived from weathering of the continental crust. The discovery that Himalayan rivers are characterized by high concentrations of dissolved Sr concentrations with high 87Sr/86Sr ratios has raised the possibility that collisional orogens play a critical role in moderating the variations in seawater 87Sr/86Sr ratios. Here we describe Himalayan carbonates and calc-silicates from Garhwal, the headwaters of the Ganges, with extreme 87Sr/86Sr ratios (>1.0). Elevated Sr-isotope ratios result from exchange with Rb-rich silicate material during both Himalayan and pre-Himalayan metamorphic episodes, and the carbonates contribute a significant fraction to the Ganges 87Sr flux. Particularly elevated 87Sr/86Sr ratios are found in calc-silicates from the Deoban Formation of the Lesser Himalaya. A detailed traverse of shales and calc-silicates from this unit confirms that carbonate horizons have increased 87Sr/86Sr ratios as a result of isotopic exchange over length scales of 1030 cm. We conclude that metamorphism of carbonates may cause elevation of their 87Sr/86Sr ratios and that uplift of metamorphosed carbonates may be a consequence of collisional orogens, which contributes to the elevation of seawater 87Sr/86Sr ratios.

Item Type: Journal Article
ISSN: 0022-1376
Keywords: carbon; geology; saline waters; seawater; Ganges; India; Bangladesh
Academic Unit/Department: Science > Environment, Earth and Ecosystems
Science
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Earth, Planetary, Space and Astronomical Research (CEPSAR)
Item ID: 4112
Depositing User: Nigel Harris
Date Deposited: 03 Jul 2006
Last Modified: 24 Feb 2016 10:31
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/4112
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