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Adapting aligned, stabilised 3D tissues for large-scale neurobiological research

O'Rourke, Caitriona; Drake, Rosemary; Loughlin, Jane and Phillips, James (2014). Adapting aligned, stabilised 3D tissues for large-scale neurobiological research. In: Tissue and Cell Engineering Society Annual Conference 2014, 2-4 July 2014, Newcastle, p. 29.

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Abstract

Recreating the 3D environment of the CNS using hydrogel matrices allows neurons and glial cells in vitro to behave similarly to their counterparts in vivo, providing a relevant tool for neurobiological studies. The overall aim is to develop robust 3D CNS tissue models engineered by a process of glial cell self-alignment and subsequently stabilised. Furthermore, these models have been developed for multi-well plate format at a scale suitable for high throughput screening. CNS tissue equivalents can be used to assess numerous aspects of the CNS in a reproducible, controllable and consistent manner.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item
Copyright Holders: 2014 The Author
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Life, Health and Chemical Sciences
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Biomedical Research Network (BRN)
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Item ID: 41050
Depositing User: Caitriona O'Rourke
Date Deposited: 08 Oct 2014 08:23
Last Modified: 06 Oct 2016 06:37
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/41050
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