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The EAP course design Quagmire – juggling the stakeholders’ perceived needs

Mansur, Saba Bahareen and Shrestha, Prithvi N. (2015). The EAP course design Quagmire – juggling the stakeholders’ perceived needs. In: Shrestha, Prithvi ed. Current Developments in English for Academic and Specific Purposes: Local innovations and global perspectives. Reading: Garnet Education, pp. 93–177.

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Abstract

This chapter explores perspectives of administrators, ESP teachers and MBA students in a Pakistani university on the English language needs of MBA students. It further tries to explore the strife caused by the administrative differences in opinion and outlook on the university’s system that restrain it from bringing much needed change in the curriculum. In doing so the chapter also looks for a way forward, that is, a way to meet the English language needs of MBA students despite the disparity in the three respective standpoints. It also offers implications of this study to other global EAP contexts.

Item Type: Book Section
Copyright Holders: 2015 IATEFL and authors
ISBN: 1-78260-162-7, 978-1-78260-162-3
Keywords: English for specific purposes; English for academic purposes; stakeholder perceptions in universities; Pakistani higher education; academic English
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS) > Languages and Applied Linguistics
Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS)
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Research in Education and Educational Technology (CREET)
Language & Literacies
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Item ID: 40831
Depositing User: Prithvi Shrestha
Date Deposited: 11 Sep 2014 15:42
Last Modified: 04 Feb 2017 09:16
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/40831
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